SAS Learning Post

Map of idioms, from around the world

An idiom is a group of words established by usage as having a meaning not deducible from those of the individual words. For example, “don’t cry over spilled milk,” or “the cat is out of the bag.” Idioms are fun to use, and fun to hear – don’t you agree? And I think idioms are even more fun if you have to first translate them from another language! That’s what this example demonstrates, and I thought it was cool enough to share with everyone!…

I spent a while with my friend Google, searching the web for interesting idioms from other countries. I was especially interested on ones that were in a different language, translated directly/literally into English, and then had an explanation of what expression actually means.

SAS Guide, SAS Tutorials and Materials, SAS Certifications

I’m a tester at heart, and the main thing I wanted to test here was whether SAS could correctly import all these characters from different languages, and also output the characters correctly in the SAS output. I found that the key to success was making sure my SAS session used utf-8 encoding. There are a couple of ways of doing that, and I chose to specify a sasv9.cfg file that contained the “-ENCODING UTF-8” option.

sas.exe worldwide_idioms.sas -config “c:\program files\sashome\x86\sasfoundation\9.4\nls\u8\sasv9.cfg”

Here are some screen captures showing a variety of language characters successfully displayed in my SAS output table, and the mouse-over text for my map:

SAS Guide, SAS Tutorials and Materials, SAS Certifications

SAS Guide, SAS Tutorials and Materials, SAS Certifications

And finally, here’s what you’ve all been waiting for … click the map image below, to see the full size interactive version of the idiom map. You can then hover your mouse over the red dots to see the idioms in the mouse-over text, or click the red dots to launch a Google search for more idioms from that country. Enjoy!

SAS Guide, SAS Tutorials and Materials, SAS Certifications

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